There is so much ancient knowledge in the world along with modern knowledge. Our modern world can master all goodness life has to offer by working within the harmony of nature. Yet somehow we have allowed much of our modern world to become steeped in the destruction without thought to long term effects of our actions. This is not to say that technology and the modern ways are not important or that they cannot have a positive effect on our lives. It's to say that if we could balance the two, ancient and modern science, then life may be more satisfying and profitable on physically, mentally and emotionally. Daily we are besieged with the news of reports about human and environmental problems resulting from a thoughtless applications of modern technology. Ancient knowledge tells us the stress of day to day life can cause the body to be in a state of dis-ease, yet people continue to watch the news hour after hour. Is it time for us to get back to a basic way of thinking instead of relying on others or machines to think for us? I think the key is balance. Once of the concepts is called "Pono".

Hawaiians think in "concepts" vs in definitions. Let's look at the concept of being "Pono". It means to do the right thing. The right thing today, in a specific situation, may not be the right thing tomorrow as yesterdays situation can never be created exactly the same way today. Hence, the concept of Pono, can also mean, balance. All things in balance or all things are the best they can be today. Hawaiian understood that nothing in life is cut and dry. For us, logical thinking is based on the a given situation and the environment surrounding that situation, which includes the emotional state of being of those concerned. 

"A"ohe pau ka 'ike i ka hālau hoʻokahi - all knowledge is not learned in just one school. 

My ideas, concepts and teaching are a culmination of the many things I have learned in my lifeʻs journey. Much of it comes from my upbringing. I did not know it at time that those of us who grow up on the Island, of local families have a different way of looking at things compared to those on the mainland. This is not so say we are better or worse, just different. Understanding there was a difference allowed me to contemplate the sociology of Hawaiian an itʻs effect on behavior actions and thought processes. 

Any knowledge I put forth is based on many different things. Some of it comes from cultural learning, book learning, social learning, school of hard knocks and innate knowledge. It what our last ruling monarch, Queen Liliʻuokalani when she said, "hear what is not said, to see what cannot be seen and to know the unknowable."

Coming Soon!

Please send me your stories!

On various holidays I send out a greeting cards to those on our mailing list. This past Motherʻs day, I send out my manaʻo (thoughts) on the relationship of how our children shape us as adults. The things we learn by being parents and the emotions that surround us as parent, and how it effects us. Based on this, I received a few stories about a personal expirience that touched them. It was in that moment I decided another book was in order. I donʻt know the name of it yet, but it but I would like your stories about those special instances where a family member does something so sweet or thoughtful and unexpected in a "split second" of time that touches your heart. 

You donʻt need to be a writer or even know how to spell. Just tell me about the story and how it made you feel, and I will write it for you. I would love your stories about Aloha Ohana. 

Random Acts of Aloha

Your stories

Those of you that have sailed with us on a cruise ship know Brian and I spend lots of time sharing our Aloha in everything we do. I teach the true meaning of Aloha, and act accordingly. As our guest begin to really understand Aloha, they begin to feel it, and give. Over the years I have been told about the many purely random of acts of Aloha. I decided to write these stories and compile them into a book. 5 stars on Amazon.com